#1 What is a driveway apron? von mutaldelicate 08.06.2021 09:00

In most areas subdivided in the last 50 years the street is located in the public right of way, usually in the middle. ... They usually have surveyed “as built” plans that will show where the right of way ends and your property begins. The work itself is actually pretty easy. Just rent a concrete saw and make the cuts, dig down to the prescribed depth (usually a foot or so) and fill with crushed rock, compact it, then place concrete on top. If you don't, and he falls, he would have a winnable “premises liability” lawsuit against you. ... Anyone can sue anyone, generally speaking. He can sue you even if it were an open and obvious condition and he were a mere licensee coming to your home to watch TV. Unfortunately you cannot legally stop your neighbor from parking in front of your house.

These repairs are done by the Department of Public Works. Curbs are part of the streets and as such, the repairs are also the city's responsibility. However, curb repair or replacement is usually only done where the curb is hazardous or is causing a significant standing water problem. While state law dictates that adjacent property owners are responsible for sidewalk repairs, Los Angeles' policy is to fix sidewalks damaged by street trees. The city has not followed through, however, angering residents who must navigate the city's maze of broken walkways. Installing stabilized gravel with permeable pavers, however, is the single cheapest and most effective solution to extending a driveway while providing long-term durability and functionality. TRUEGRID offers every type of paver you need to match your driveway situation. In California, municipalities and counties usually own the sidewalks next to private property, but California state law long enacted states that the landowners are responsible for maintaining the sidewalk fronting their property in a safe and usable manner. Crumbling concrete can be repaired before crazing occurs. Crumbling concrete is not just unsightly, it may also be a sign of serious damage beneath the structure. Address the problem as soon as possible to prevent it from spreading or causing other damage, such as crazing, in which a network of random cracks occurs. In most cases the sidewalk and curb are both in the public right of way. In most areas subdivided in the last 50 years the street is located in the public right of way, usually in the middle. ... They usually have surveyed “as built” plans that will show where the right of way ends and your property begins. The work itself is actually pretty easy. Just rent a concrete saw and make the cuts, dig down to the prescribed depth (usually a foot or so) and fill with crushed rock, compact it, then place concrete on top. If you don't, and he falls, he would have a winnable “premises liability” lawsuit against you. ... Anyone can sue anyone, generally speaking. He can sue you even if it were an open and obvious condition and he were a mere licensee coming to your home to watch TV. Unfortunately you cannot legally stop your neighbor from parking in front of your house. Try kindly asking them to stop parking there. If proper communication doesn't work, you can try filing a nuisance complaint or police report against them. Actually, no. Since Public Roadways are just that, "public," no one has the right to reserve spaces in front of his or her house. However, while it is not illegal to park in front of someone else's house, it is certainly inconsiderate.

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